Aftercare

Jim, a 49-year-old athlete and pilot, was on the basketball court when his heart stopped without warning. His teammates, who were firefighters, followed the Take Heart America system of care, saving his life.

Take Heart America

Connecting survivors and their loved ones through support and education.
Cardiac arrest is rare in any given community, but common nationwide. Only about 1% of all 911 calls involve a cardiac arrest. With less than a 20% overall survival rate in the best EMS systems, survivors often find themselves needing support. A number of local and national resources help survivors assimilate back into their communities and aid families in sharing the challenges of the recovery process. These entities provide a critical bridge between survivors and families, since survivors often have no recollection of the event, even though it was extremely traumatic for their families and loved ones.

A new normal.
While a heart attack is often caused by blockage (“plumbing”), a cardiac arrest is usually the result of an electrical malfunction. That’s why an internal defibrillator or ICD is usually placed inside the survivor’s chest. This implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) prevents recurrence of arrhythmias and lets the survivor take certain anti-arrhythmic drugs that may be potentially harmful without the ICD.

Survivor support resources:
Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association
Life After SCA
Parent Heart Watch

Aftercare

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